The Uhlans and the ladder


A cute photograph for this sunny Sunday, with these German Uhlans climbing on a ladder. In 1914, the Imperial German Army included twenty-six Uhlan regiments, three of which were Guard regiments, twenty-one line (sixteen Prussian, two Württemberg and three Saxon) and two from the autonomous Royal Bavarian Army. All German Uhlan regiments wore Polish style czapkas and tunics with plastron fronts, both in coloured parade uniforms and the field grey service dress introduced in 1910. Because German hussar, dragoon and cuirassier regiments also carried lances in 1914, there was a tendency among their French and British opponents to describe all German cavalry as “uhlans”.

After seeing mounted action during the early weeks of World War I, the Uhlan regiments were either dismounted to serve as “cavalry rifles” in the trenches of the Western Front, or transferred to the Eastern Front where more primitive conditions made it possible for horse cavalry to still play a useful role. All twenty-six German Uhlan regiments were disbanded in 1918 – 1919 (source: Wikipedia).

fxb072gjj

Advertisements

One thought on “The Uhlans and the ladder

  1. The helmet covers that regular German soldiers used even included a sock appendage for the spike on top. These silly Uhlans cavalrymen seem to have covers too but not on their characteristic square airfoil helmet bosses. They don’t look comfortable on a ladder either. Could there be a special military issue folding cavalry ladder suitable for a lancer to carry on a horse?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s